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rmfortin
01-03-2008, 05:52 PM
Hi--so glad this site exists! I've played my Strad with pride for 30 years and hope to do so for at least 30 more...

I have a model 37 MB, lacquer finish, built in 1975. The laquer is original and pretty rough in the typical areas. Time for a restoration, but of course the options these days seem almost limitless. A couple questions I hope someone can answer:

I'm considering having it refinished in gold plate, primarily for the durability of the gold versus lacquer (apparently, my italian sweat is like battery acid to lacquer). And yes, I've tried valve covers, cotton gloves and the like, but the lacquer always seemed to get damaged somewhere anyway.

Realizing that this horn isn't a particularly rare or unique model--am I hurting the value of the instrument by refinishing it differently than the original factory finish? I'm also considering having a third valve water key added--does that sort of customization impact value negatively?

(Guess I'm suffering analysis paralysis that I blame on Antiques Roadshow, from seeing some poor schmuck with a vase that would be worth a fortune in the original finish, but because he polished it up with Brasso, it's worthless.)

Thanks so much for any advice--Ross

imported_TrumpetMaster
01-04-2008, 05:16 PM
Just plate it however you like and don't worry about it. Gold would work best but I have seen people eat through that as well. IMHO those valve covers seem to do more harm than good.




Hi--so glad this site exists! I've played my Strad with pride for 30 years and hope to do so for at least 30 more...

I have a model 37 MB, lacquer finish, built in 1975. The laquer is original and pretty rough in the typical areas. Time for a restoration, but of course the options these days seem almost limitless. A couple questions I hope someone can answer:

I'm considering having it refinished in gold plate, primarily for the durability of the gold versus lacquer (apparently, my italian sweat is like battery acid to lacquer). And yes, I've tried valve covers, cotton gloves and the like, but the lacquer always seemed to get damaged somewhere anyway.

Realizing that this horn isn't a particularly rare or unique model--am I hurting the value of the instrument by refinishing it differently than the original factory finish? I'm also considering having a third valve water key added--does that sort of customization impact value negatively?

(Guess I'm suffering analysis paralysis that I blame on Antiques Roadshow, from seeing some poor schmuck with a vase that would be worth a fortune in the original finish, but because he polished it up with Brasso, it's worthless.)

Thanks so much for any advice--Ross

jp554731
02-05-2008, 02:16 AM
Just plate it however you like and don't worry about it. Gold would work best but I have seen people eat through that as well. IMHO those valve covers seem to do more harm than good.

yea but some people perfer the feel of fake leather over metal. I know I do. :p

bassmannate
03-29-2008, 08:28 AM
This will absolutely affect the value of the instrument. When they refinish an instrument, they have to buff off the original finish. In the process, they have to buff off a bit of the metal as well making the walls of the instrument thinner. You might be able to get away with refinishing it once though. I work in a repair shop where we can't do the work there but we do send instruments off to shops to have it done. I've seen one come back from a second re lacquer and the bell was paper thin.

Also, good luck finding a place that will do a GOOD job of refinishing. Like I said before, we send instruments off to get them refinished and everywhere we've tried it seems that something always comes back wrong. Often times they didn't take the time to thoroughly clean the instrument after buffing and we find buffing rouge still on the instrument.

Dale Proctor
03-31-2008, 04:01 PM
Yep - a refinish job by someone who knows what they're doing won't hurt the value of a fairly common horn. A nice prep job and gold plating will probably enhance its value. A heavy hand on the buffing wheel will destroy its value, though. Make sure you entrust it to a skilled shop.

Concerning the "Antiques Roadshow" syndrome, with a true antique horn, original finish is desirable, even if it's not perfect. You don't lose points, however, for removing the patina from an old silver plated horn.....;)