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Bach LR180ML
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11 16590
Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers $1,831.13 8.9

 

Description:
A unique configuration offering the quick response of a lightweight model with the projection of a standard. Features lightweight body, standard weight bell, and reversed construction #25LR mouthpipe. Available in three bore sizes (M, ML, L).
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Bore (inch): 0.459
Bell (inch): 4.8125
Bell Type: 1 Piece
Bell Mtl.: Yellow Brass
Valves: 3, Monel
Website: http://www.bachbrass.com/
Keywords: Bach LR180ML
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Review Date: 11/13/2005 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $1,650.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Superb Bach Tone; Extremely Responsive; Balanced Feel;
Cons: Lively horn initially requires more concentration to slot.

 
The Bach Stradivarius LR180/37 (i.e. reversed-leadpipe model/lightweight body/standard-weight bell) is the overlooked jewel in the Bach line. Having played a standard Bach Strad 180/37S for years, the first difference I noticed between the two horns was the more free-blowing nature of the reverse-leadpipe design. This, coupled with the LR horn's lightweight body, makes for a much more responsive trumpet. In short, you get the famed resonant Bach sound with quicker response and less resistance (Requiring about a third less effort overall than the standard-weight model.).

What sold me on this model over the Bach LT series (Which I played for a substantial trial run before selecting the LR model), was the LR model's standard-weight bell. While I found the LT model produced too bright a sound for legit music and small combo jazz, the standard-weight bell of the LR model adds enough mass to horn that there is warmth to its tone. To further hedge this bet, I chose the LR in lacquer-finish (Silver is too thin a finish to dampen the tone I typically get with most horns. I can blow brightness out of a lacquer-finished trumpet. I can't always darken the tone of a silver-plated horn unless it is particluarly heavy.). The overall fit and finish is adequate - standard for Bach - and the weight and balance of the instrument makes it a joy to hold over long sessions. The action of the valves is superb. I highly recommend the LR Bach as the more responsive, easy-playing alternative to Bach's standard-weight horn.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 4/10/2006 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $1,850.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Tone, intonation, response
Cons: Average valves

 
I play a silvered LR180/72. This trumpet is very responsive and "slots in" very well. Intonation is very good for a Bach and high register seems more secure than with standard leadpipe construction. The only lacquered LR180/72 I tried was very difficult to play, but it may have been the occasional lemon. The 72 bell gives a wonderful fat sound in low and middle register and silky smooth high register. On the minus side, it makes the trumpet more tiring than the classic 43 bell, which is easier but with a more commercial sound. The LR180/43 is the trumpet of choice if you constantly live over High C (I could hit the double high C on this one, which never happened to me before).
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Anonymous
Review Date: 4/19/2006 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Easy blowing
Cons: A bit thin sound

 
In the past Ive tested two models of the LR180-43 and I love the feeling of it.
Opens up easily with a nice, bright sound. The only drawback comparing it to normal or heavy weighted horns it seems, that the sound tends to be at the thin side. Anyway a horn defenitely on my wishlist.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 6/22/2006 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $1,600.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Flexibility, tone
Cons: build quality

 
I have the LR180S72 and the sound is just about perfect for what I play. There is noticeable less resistance than I had in my old 180S37. Initially, I was overshooting notes, now I now where they live. I am disappointed in the build quality, particularly the cosmetics. Excess solder, visible solder gaps in other areas and tooling marks visible though the finish. Yet, where it truly counts, in the sound, the horn has it.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 11/12/2007 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $2,300.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: great open sound,great valves
Cons: none

 
I have a a LR180S43. I've had this horn for about 2 months now. And i can't find anything wrong with this horn. The valves are really smooth and work amazingly, the horn gives a big open warm sound, and sounds great in a section. the horn plays beautifly and is deffinetly worth the money.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 12/10/2007 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $920.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Better response than standard Bachs I've tested, great intonation
Cons: 1st valve slide a little loose, maybe leaks a little on certain pitches with slide extended.

 
I bought this horn sixteen years ago after playing a Claude Gordon Selmer for a dozen years. My teachers had been complaining about the lack of focus I was getting on the Selmer, and in the big band I could often not be heard even though I was blowing my brains out.

I like the response of the lightweight body with the standard bell. It has a focused core like most Bach Strads, but it responds a lot like my CG Selmer, though with a little more resistance. Slots are good up to E or F above high C; higher notes tend to be a little more slippery. Intonation is much better than the standard Strads.

Projection is wonderful, and this is a fine all-around horn for the player who does a little bit of everything, like me. I really have no need for any other Bb trumpet in my arsenal. With a few different mouthpiece setups I can get any sound I need.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 2/12/2008 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: free blowing, nice open sound
Cons: RLP is bad for lyres

 
I got issued this horn in September. Since then my personal Yamaha 6335 has been sitting under my bed. The Bach has a brighter sound and slots in easier (both a pro and con). But I am loving this horn for all styles. From big band to chamber to military to jazz combos.
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Review Date: 5/14/2008 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $1,800.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: rich, dark sound; open feel, can project if you need it too
Cons: i got lemon-ed in the valve department

 
i've been playing an LR180-72S for all of my undergrad. when i bought the horn, i had no idea i would one day being trying to play lead in big band on it. the horn can get loud and bright if you really, really want it to, but it's a whole lot of work; more than it should be. even playing a shallow cup lead piece like the schilke 14A4a or marcinkiewicz ingram can only do so much. furthermore, the horn simply doesn't slot notes above double G (G above high C.) it is for these reasons i switched to the schilke B2.
on the other hand...
this is an incredible horn for symphonic work. getting a huge, dark tone on this horn is effortless. the tone is warm and full regardless of the dynamic level- resonates through a hall at pianissimo and sounds like a cannon at fortissimo. it will take every ounce of air that you give it, even with the ML
.459 bore. the tone won't distort at high volumes- always rich and dark. the response is pretty good in the middle to mid-high range.
the only overall problem with the horn in the symphonic setting is the legendary bach inconsistency- i've played many strads with great valves- but my horn has pretty terrible valve action. the first and second valves stick almost daily, and when i pull the valves out, the nickel has worn off to reveal the brass in very odd places. it appears that the valves don't exactly depress evenly. however, as i've played other bach horns without this problem, i imagine i just got lemon-ed on this particular horn.

overall- great horn, but don't bring it to big band if you're reading the lead book.
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Review Date: 4/30/2009 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Great for playing in churches and orchestral music, super fast valve action, good slotting, very even from top to bottom
Cons: Sometimes a little too bright, slotting a little squirrely in the extreme upper register although that might just be me

 
Great horn. Was my main instrument for the last 13 years or so, until I bought a vintage Manhattan strad which better suits most of the playing I'm doing.

I love this horn, and it sounds phenomenal, particularly for orchestral playing. Lots lots lots of overtones and a very angelic, ringing sound. Only problem is sometimes you don't want that angelic ringing sound - not the best horn for jazz work.

Check out the song Backseat by Carina Round (music video here:http://video.aol.com/video/backseat/aol:mrt:128776) and listen to the trumpet stuff at the end - that's all me playing this horn and I really like the way it sounds, particularly for this style of playing.

Check out the song Go Get It Started at http://www.myspace.com/albertkhasky for another example of this horn in a more funk oriented context.
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Review Date: 5/25/2010 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $2,200.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Very free blowing, good intonation, lovely tone, not too bright not too dark, quick response, great flexibilty, excellent fit and finish
Cons: None

 
I bought this horn a couple days ago and it is my first pro horn. I got the LR180S37. I've been playing a Yamaha 2335 for the past 5 years or so and been playing for a total of 7 years.

My first thought as I blew through the horn was, "Wow, this is so free-blowing and has barely any resistance!!!" It was a far cry from my Yammie, which is very stuffy and resistant. Apparently the reverse lead pipe is doing wonders. My range has shot up almost half an octave on this Strad.

The tone is exactly what Bach Strads are known for: That rich, warm, sound that is so pleasing to the ear. It rests somewhere in the middle between bright and dark, but gravitates more towards the darker side. It can also brighten up considerably as pne moves up the staff or increase volume, but does not break up and become nasty and "splatty" at high dynamic levels.

Response and flexibility are excellent, and are definitely a level up from the standard 180S37, probably because of the lightweight body, but the tone matches that of a heavier weight trumpet because the bell is normal weight.

Intonation is pretty good too. I don't have to pull out too much on my low D and C#, and all other notes require little or no tuning adjustments.

Lastly, the fit and finish are excellent. The silver plating is extremely even, all welds are clean, and all braces/finger hooks are attached straight.

Now, I know that people have discounted Bach's quality in recent years, and rightly so, because they have turned out some inconsistently made products in the last decade or two. However, since the strike in 2006, many people have remarked, and I personally feel, that the quality standards of these new Strads have gone up. These "True Bach" trumpets are definitely worth taking a look at. And if one does want to get a Strad, the reverse lead pipe model is an interesting alternative to the standard silver 37.
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AQSW
Junior Member

Registered: October 2012
Location: Star, Idaho
Posts: 1
Review Date: 12/28/2012 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $2,329.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Free blowing, open feel in the upper register, quick response, great finish, good tone and intonation
Cons: Bell thickness

 
I own the Bach LR180S43 Stradivarius Bb Trumpet and I have owned it for a little over 11 months.This horn is a post strike horn from 2011 and it looks just like one built in 2001 or before. This is a very superb horn that I would recommend to anyone who likes to play many styles. Compared to Yamaha's that I have played it seemed that the Bach's had more tone colour and they didn't have clunky valves like the Yamaha. I like the 43 more than the 37 for one reason, brightness. When I played on a 37 it was good but it didn't have the sizzle I was looking for. I use the 43 for my lead big band work, symphonic settings, solos, etc. The only issue I have with this horn is that you have to be really careful with the bell. The bell thickness on Bach's is less than many other manufacturers like Yamaha due to the response and feeling higher in the register. Other than that aspect I love this horn! Planning on getting the same one, just customized in the future.
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