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Bach Mouthpiece
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15 26046
Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers $36.57 7.5

 

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Website: http://www.selmer.com
Keywords: Bach Mouthpiece
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Anonymous
Review Date: 9/2/2004 Would you recommend the product? No | Price you paid?: $30.00 | Rating: 5 

 
Pros: Cheap
Cons: Inconsistent sizes and quality

 
Bach should wake up and revamp the entire line of trumpet mouthpieces. Too many sizes (many are probably never used) and illogical cup depths. Many pros use the larger sizes (1C, 1-1/2C and 3C)but it's very difficult to switch cup depths for various keyed horns. Too difficult to have custom work done at the factory. If you like a 5C and want a 5E for your piccolo, you're out of luck! Curry Mouthpieces did what Bach should have done to the product line! Want a better Bach? - buy a Curry.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 10/28/2004 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $35.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Good range, good price
Cons:

 
I play a Bach 7CFL on the Flugelhorn and this piece produces a nice tone (a bit brighter then some other pieces with deeper cups) and the best range of a standard flugelhorn mouthpiece I've found. The inside of the rim is just slightly sharper (good flexibility) and it's taper just enough to help the upper register. It's an affordable, easy to find first mouthpiece and a great starting point. I recommend you play them to find the best width for you... for about $35 it's a great value and the overall quality is very good. I found the Yamaha and Stork to have "softer" rims and are a bit deeper and heavier, so they have a deeper tone quality. I also recommned those, but I'd go with the Bach for a first piece.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 9/9/2005 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $29.75 | Rating: 7 

 
Pros: Inexpensive, many sizes
Cons: No bigger than 17mm, many sizes

 
I've been playing on Bach since I started in the 4th grade (almost 20 years ago). Switched from the 3C to a 1C about seven years ago and was pleased with the increase in room for my chops. In my opinion, the variety of sizes available is a benefit - you can choose the right mouthpiece for your gig/music/application/etc. However, there is a downside - you can get lost and frustrated trying to figure out what mouthpiece(s) you should test and buy. Another reviewer said that Bacvh has too many sizes and I might agree with that - who the hell uses a 2 or a 6 or a 6B? The Bach mouthpieces sound great as far as I'm concerned and for under $30 they're worth the money. I currently use a 1C and 1D.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 10/8/2005 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $32.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: 6C is superb, Bach offers a, huge variety of sizes and rims
Cons: wide variance from one model to the next

 
I'm writing this in regards to the Bach 6C trumpet mouthpiece. I'd tried a few 7C's over time (a new model, with far too harsh of bite; an older Mt Vernon, didn't like the cup shape or throat) and after a marathon mouthpiece crusade I agreed to try a Bach 6C. It made a world of difference -- the rim on the 6 is superb, just enough grip, just wide enough yet flexible, and no leakage out the sides as I had on trumpet with Curry, Schilke and Stork. I do not have "fat lips", so less padding to push against for a seal and as a result the extra pressure needed on the other pieces I tried was killing my endurance. Flugel and Cornet are a different story, as those instruments have far less resistance than a trumpet. For the Flugel, Curry is the hands-down winner due to sweet tone and great rim. If you've been burnt by playing a Bach 7C on trumpet, try the 6C or 6BM (wider throat, more open), it may make all the difference! Good luck!
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Review Date: 10/30/2005 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $60.00 | Rating: 7 

 
Pros: price
Cons:

 
Bach mouthpieces are good for somethings, like, if you play a bach trumpet, it fits in the receiver easier with less "gap" resulting in better harmonics and whatnot. However, bach just isn't the same bach anymore, and they're not very consistent.

Also, I would suggest if you just love bach, go with a megatone, the sound really does warm up and there is more core.

It's a good cheapie mouthpiece, but if you play seriously, I suggest something different.

P.S. The reason it was 60 dollars and not 30-35 as they normally are was because I got mine gold satin plated, it looks pretty.
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Review Date: 12/20/2005 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: solid tone, consistent
Cons: plating wears off quickly

 
I currently own about three of these Bach mouthpieces and they have served me well over the past couple of years. The only thing I can say bad about them is that the plating tends to wear off quickly on the shank.
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Review Date: 2/20/2006 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $45.00 | Rating: 0 

 
Pros: Good quality for its price
Cons: too many sizes that a majority of people will never use, plating wears rather fast

 
I've used these when I was young, I've used their C's mouthpieces and I liked them. But for a serious player, don't limit yourself just to bach, try other brands too. On the other hand Bach isn't the same as it was in its glory days.
My only real concern about these is that the shank's silver plate will wear off in a matter of months if kept unchecked.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 8/16/2006 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $29.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Low Price, fine quality
Cons: Tooling inconsistent

 
I've been playing for quite a number of years and like other trumpet players, I have gone through many different mouthpieces by many manufacturers. You get to a point where you realize that no matter which mouthpiece you choose, you must work with a mouthpiece to attain whatever it is you are trying to do on the trumpet. I find the Bach 7CW just about perfect for most of my playing and sometimes use a Yamaha 14B4. In the 50's I used a Bach 10-3/4C and stayed with that mouthpiece for many years and found it to be a great all-around piece. I do not know if the new ones' measure up to the older Mt. Vernon models, but I regret ever selling that old piece.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 8/21/2006 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $29.62 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Inexpensive
Cons: No respect

 
I started on a 7C and quickly tried other mouthpieces seeing if anything was better. While in spain found some I don't even remembber who made but found small or shallow was not very good to me. Then in high school I tried a guys 3C and loved it as High notes and low notes were actually easier after playing on it for just 2 days. Then someone had a 1C and played that for a week or so and got Schilke 20D2d and that was awesome. Well now playing again I got a 1C for while ant had to get my 'Ol 20D2d. Then got a Bach TR200S and wow it sounded good but had an ithcing to try a Bach on the Bach. So I got a 1B. Wow what a sound. Very similar to a 20D2d but more overtones and can get it to go anywhere I want it to for color of sound. Heck I no longer gave Bach lugs any respect I just never knew they made such a beast and is the first one I have personally seen. Need more stock and variation in stores to allow you to tryout.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 3/23/2007 Would you recommend the product? No | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 3 

 
Pros: availability
Cons: inconsistant sizing

 
Why do so many people recommend them. Much better available at a lower price.
Cornet and flugel mouthpieces sound too 'trumpety'.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 4/7/2007 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $39.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: 3C very comfortable, helps with endurance
Cons: Plating wears off pretty fast

 
I am a senior in my highschool, and I plan to major trumpet in university.

After using various no-name 7C trumpuet mouthpieces, I realized my
tone was very insecure and stuffy. My trumpet teacher was using a
Bach mouthpiece, and he introduced me to the 3C. I bought the MPC
without knowing what the differences the MPCs could have on my playing.

Well, I have been playing on my 3C for about 2 years (played the trumpet
for 3 years) and I was able to make HUGE improvements in the past 2 years.
I find that the 3C gives me a very colourful and bright sound on my Strad 37
But I have trouble with the upper register. However, I believe this could be
me, since I am an amature player. With the pedal notes, I have trouble with
the C. I could get all the other notes, but instead of getting the low C,
I get a lower G instead.

The 3C is very comfortable on my lips, and it helps with my endurance.
I currently play my horn for more than 6 hours a day, so I could improve.
The mouthpiece is so comfortable on my lips, that it allows me to play
for more than 6 hours...


Hope this helped :)
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Anonymous
Review Date: 5/8/2007 Would you recommend the product? No | Price you paid?: $36.00 | Rating: 4 

 
Pros: comfortable rim
Cons: small throat, carelessly built backbore, hard to perform at FFF and ppp dynamics, limits my range

 
The Bach 3C has a rich mellow tone but is inflexible while in the lower register. I would reccomend a Schilke 15 or 14.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 11/2/2007 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $35.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: The 1B is absolutely amazing for symphonic and "movie-type" jazz, character.
Cons: A ring of silver tarnish forms around the shank very quickly and I have OCD in terms of things like these.

 
What I like about the larger Bach mouthpieces in general is that, unlike some other brands, (I'm looking at you, Curry) Bachs often have a nice, dark sound with a lot of good overtones. Also, call me crazy, but I personally like using a 1B for jazz because it's easy to achieve a greater level of character and color in my tone. Other than that, I like the rim and the bite because it gives you one heck of a bark! (pun intended).
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JazzyJonas
Junior Member

Registered: May 2007
Location: Bowling Green, KY
Posts: 1
Review Date: 7/14/2008 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $35.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Sound, Rim, Versatility
Cons: None

 
I play a 1 & 1/2 B for everything because it works for everything. It also has a 22 bore. With Bach mouthpieces, the magic combination for the B cups is a 22 bore with the stock Schmidt (large, outwardly curved) backbore and the C cups work best with a 26 bore and stock #10 backbore if you like some more resistance/natural brilliance. I have little experience with other Bach mouthpieces (there are way too many-most are worthless from what I have heard). They all need to be drilled out and Vincent himself recommended this as the 27 bore was intended only to be the "pilot" hole. He used to give jewelry reamers away to people who visited the factory so they could work the bore out to their liking. Most professionals who play a Bach mouthpiece have it drilled out significantly. The B cup is also slightly funnel shaped toward the bottom and that provides a nice focus with ample room for your lips to vibrate. Not to undermine Monette mouthpieces (they certainly are fantastic), but the main advantage they have is the large bore coupled with a balanced backbore and the Bach B series with a 22 bore achieves the same excellent pitch center and wide range of overtones for hundreds less. If you are not satisfied with your ability to produce the sound in your head, try a 1 & 1/2 B or a 5 B with a 22 bore for 21 days and I'll bet you and others will notice how much better you sound! I also like the Curry 70 M as it is a well-balanced and comfortable piece, but it just won't do in the concert hall with an orchestra (although, it kills for lead playing!). I am finally done with switching mouthpieces because, as a grad student/working player, consistency and amazing tone are usually the order of the day and not having to switch equipment for big band, jazz combo, wind ensemble, chamber ensemble, etc. is a real load off my mind. And you can find these all day for under $40!
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David Smith
Junior Member

Registered: December 2008
Location: Williamsport, PA
Posts: 4
Review Date: 8/15/2010 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $40.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Good Tone, Comfortable
Cons: None

 
V.Bach 5B Cornet MP: medium deep cup, 16.25mm cup diameter, medium wide rim lowered toward the outside medium sharp edge, #7 dark Schmittt-style backbore, standard #27 3.66mm throat.
As always, what works for me may not work for you. I have been playing this mp for over a year. It has provided me with a well balanced playing experience. The tone is just mellow enough to achieve the sound I want. The rim is comfortable. My range is good, as is the intonation. The price is right. I have played a long bell cornet with this mouthpiece in a community wind ensemble and have been pleased with how well this mp and horn combination blends, yet does nicely for solos. I would suggest this MP is an excellent choice for the intermediate or advanced student or community ensemble player wanting a more mellow tone than found with a Bach C cup.
20110605 I have added a Bach 5B Trumpet MP as one of my main pieces for my Bb trumpet. As with the cornet version, it is does a very good job, producing a richer tone than the 5C.
V.Bach 5V Cornet. Very deep cup, #20 (4.09mm) throat and #25 backbore. This is my main mp for my E.K.Blessing B-141S short bell british style cornet. This is a modern deep V mp and produces a good mellow tone on this horn. Think British Brass Band or SA Band.
V.Bach 6C Trumpet, with a distinctive C trumpet cup. This is my main mp for my C Trumpet, providing a better C Trumpet sound than the 7C that shipped with it.
Of note, when selecting a Bach MP the discriptions as well as the throat and back bore explanations must be read. The sizing system does not always get you the MP you may think.
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