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Olds NA10MU
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5 8809
Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers $299.80 5.6

 

Description:
Same as NA10M with first valve slide thumb hook.

ADVANCED STUDENT upgrade model,
brass, epoxy lacquer, nickel trim, Monel
valves, .460" bore, 5" bell, two Amado
water keys, third valve slide ring, 7C
mouthpiece, full gladstone case (10-yr warranty)
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Bore (inch): 0.460
Bell (inch): 5.000
Website: http://www.feolds.com
Keywords: Olds NA10MU
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Review Date: 10/11/2004 Would you recommend the product? No | Price you paid?: $250.00 | Rating: 3 

 
Pros: Decent sound
Cons: Poorly constructed valves

 
When I bought this Horn I thought I had a good deal, but after a week (horn was used, but in new-condition) the valves became very bad. They required oil every 5 minutes, but it wouldn't bind. The oil would just spill out of the bottom.

Definately not recommended

-chief
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Anonymous
Review Date: 6/12/2005 Would you recommend the product? No | Price you paid?: $280.00 | Rating: 1 

 
Pros: price
Cons: quality, slides, valves, lack of thumb ring, tuning, fuzzy tone, too restrictive

 
This was the horn I began playing on, and have since gone through a Getzen 700 Eterna II, and a Schilke B6, and have played numerous other horns, from budget student models to Monettes. I can honestly say that this is probably the worst horn on the market. The overall quality is abdominable, particularly the cheap valves and slides. The horn doesn't even have a thumb ring. Stay far, far away from this horn.
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Anonymous
Review Date: 9/20/2005 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $369.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Pretty horn (nickle and laquer finish), pleasing tone, smooth valves, price
Cons: Cheap case, Difficult to clear condensation from tuning slide water key.

 
This horn is a "phantom" E.K. Blessing. Although the Olds name is stamped on the bell, the horn is manufactured by Blessing in Elkhart, IN.

I have to say that it seems that there is no reason for Olds to continue selling horns under the current name. F.E. Olds went out of business a long time ago and the name was purchased by unknowns who sell Olds branded instruments manufactured by other companies.

I think a better choice is to spend $40 more and go with the E.K. Blessing XL-TR intermediate horn. That model is basically the same as this "Olds" trumpet with the addition of a 1st valve slide trigger.

One can't help but wonder if the "best" of the barrel horns that come out of Blessing's Elkhart factory are reserved for the E.K. Blessing name?
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Anonymous
Review Date: 4/22/2006 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $400.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: powerfull sound, good sound in high range
Cons: takes practice to get used to, no tuning slide supports

 
I have played this horn for 4 years, playing all music, mainly jazz. This makes a great lead jazz trumpet(thats what i am) but it does take getting used to. The trumpet has more backpressure than others, so when someone swithches form this to a professional, you can blow and play really good. This trumpet has been good.
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Review Date: 9/29/2009 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $200.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: nice, crisp, full sound
Cons: dragging valves

 
While I agree that the horn has some valve issues (ie slow to spring back up), I still think this is a quality horn for the student. For one thing, with a .460 bore, it will cause you to expand your lungs a bit, but if you have enough volume to fill up the horn, it has a really nice tone.

On the valve issue: This was driving me crazy for a while. I could not get the third valve to respond the way it should. Then I read about this organic (and I am no tree hugger) valve oil from BERP. It's canola oil-based, so I thought I might just put a couple of drops of canola oil on the valve to see what happened. The worst thing would be that I would have to clean the valve off and wipe out the casing. I put three drops of the canola and two or three drops of Roche'-Thomas, and BAM! Worked like a champ. Fast and quiet, no more dragging. I have a 1955 York National, too, that had the same issue, and the canola solved that.

Having said all that, I would not use the canola very often, maybe once every four or five days, but only when your horn needs it. I would also give the horn a warm, soapy bath every couple of weeks to make sure there's no build-up happening.

Old horns, new horns - this seems to be one way, and a cheap one at that, to get the valves moving like they should
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